How to tell the Difference between a Benefit and Feature in 3 Easy Ways

Benefits vs featuresContrary to popular belief, features and benefits are two different things. But can you tell the difference between them?

Interestingly, most people are unable to distinguish between them. But fear not! We are going to show you 3 easy ways to tell the difference between benefits and features.

1 – What’s in it for me?

Internet marketing resources tell us that we need to always provide a benefit to customers. As such, one of the first things you need to see is who the benefit or feature is for. For example, when purchasing a digital camera, you need to ask yourself, “What’s in it for me?”

A CMOS sensor in a camera is a great feature but if it doesn’t do something for you, it’s just another feature. However, in the same camera, a 12-megapixel camera that allows you to capture high-resolution photos like never before is a benefit because there is something in it for you. Phrasing it so was probably part of the small business marketing strategy.

2 – See if it solves a Problem

Sometimes, you need to ask yourself, does it really solve my problem? Using the same camera example, would a 4-inch LCD, as opposed to a 4-inch LED, really solve any problem? If it cannot, it’s just another feature; probably another small business marketing strategy.

In another example, if you are on an online flower store and you have an Internet marketing resource such as 24/7 deliver, it is a feature. However, if it solves a problem you have, such as availability, it automatically becomes a benefit. Remember, it is only a benefit if it actually helps you in any way, shape or form.

3 – Which means that…

Looking at a product description is usually enough to tell us whether something is a benefit or feature. This is why many businesses see proper packaging as an important part of a small business marketing strategy. However, when you cannot, try adding the above sentence at the end of every feature you see. For example:

  • Features a large 8-inch subwoofer.
  • Features a large 8-inch subwoofer, which means that you hear perfect bass without any distortion.

Anything after that sentence – which means that – is a benefit. Anything before that is a feature.

As such, you need to always read the packaging and ask yourself questions. Most importantly, if it helps you, benefits you or solves a problem, it is likely a benefit. If you have a marketing resource such as a help desk, and it is always there, even if nobody uses it, then it is a feature until someone uses it; in which case it will become a benefit for them.

Comments

  1. Great points. Lucy, I appreciate your examples. They bring it to a practical and applicable level.

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