Who Is My Perfect Customer?

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This lesson is about “Who Is My Perfect Customer?-How to get real with who you are selling toWeek 2 Day 1

WHO DO YOU SHARE YOUR MARKETING MESSAGE WITH?

You have great products and services.

• You are ready to tell everyone about it.

But where do you start?

• How do you know who to share your marketing message with?

MAKE YOUR COMMUNICATION EFFECTIVE

Understanding the individual details about your perfect customer is important because it makes your communication more genuine and effective.

TALK ONE-ON-ONE TO CONNECT

If you focus on talking to an individual who you understand, you are more likely to make a meaningful connection.

OVERVIEW

In this lesson, we’ll provide a framework to help you identify who would be your perfect customer.

• You’ll create a detailed profile of their essential qualities so you can personalize your marketing materials to connect with individuals that meet those characteristics.

THIS LESSON’S OBJECTIVES

Over the course of this lesson you’ll:

  • List the demographics of your perfect customer.
  • Describe what things they find valuable.
  • And itemize where your company’s message can connect with your perfect customer’s values.
YOU CAN DO THIS!

Each lesson includes the three styles for adult learners with:

• An Audio File

• A Written Transcript

• And a Practice Guide that gives you “hands-on” training customized to your own business.

WHAT MAKES YOUR CUSTOMER SPECIAL?

How would you describe the person you are selling to?

  • What makes them special?

Do they seem like a faceless group of people?

  • Or perhaps you know who they are, what they like…or don’t like as clearly as if they were a member of your family?

Here’s an example:

EXAMPLE: CAT LADY

I have a cat boarding facility.

  • My perfect customer is a single female age 40-60.
  • She drives a Volvo sedan in any color but red.
  • Her pet is very important to her and she spends $200-$300 each month on grooming and boarding.
  • She is a college graduate with an annual income between $60,000-$75,000 and she has owned her home for at least 2 years.
  • Oh yes, and she subscribes to “Cat Fancy” magazine.
GET SPECIFIC

The fact is you need to get this specific to focus your message and make the most of your marketing efforts.

COMMON DEMOGRAPHICS

Here are some common demographics to identify for your perfect customer:

What is their:

• Age?

• Gender?

• Marital Status?

• Presence of children in the home?

• Job Type?

• Estimated Household Income?

• Net Worth Estimate?

• And Monthly Purchase Amounts?

WHERE DO THEY LIVE?

Where do they live, for example:

• City?

• State?

• Zip Code?

• Telephone Area Code?

• Renter or Homeowner?

• Dwelling Type?

• Estimated Current Home Value?

• Length of Residence?

• And the Year Their Home Was Built?

WHAT ARE THEIR LIKES & DISLIKES?

And what are they like, for instance:

  • Do they respond to direct mail?
  • What lifestyle do they associate themselves with?
  • And what magazines do they subscribe to?
WHAT ABOUT BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS?

Sometimes your perfect customer is another business.

In this case you would look for the following characteristics:

• Industry Type

• Standard Industry Code

• Business Type

• Annual Sales Amount

• Number of Employees

• Years in Business

• And trade publications they receive

PRACTICE GUIDE: DESCRIBE YOUR PERFECT CUSTOMER

In this lesson’s practice guide, we provide a framework for listing the demographics of who you are talking with.

  • Use this structure to describe your perfect customer

WHAT DO THEY VALUE?

Now that you understand some of the demographics of your perfect customer, let’s look at what types of things they value.

Here’s an example:

EXAMPLE: SUSHI RESTAURANT

I am planning to open a sushi restaurant.

My unique selling proposition is that I provide a unique, creative dining experience for people who like taking risks.

What types of values are important to my perfect customer?

HIERARCHY OF NEEDS

In Abraham Maslow’s 1943 paper on the hierarchy of human needs, he identified 5 general categories that shape the things people value.

Things such as safety, love and understanding, esteem and self-actualization form the basis for listing the types of things that we value.

JUST LIKE EMOTIONAL DRIVERS

You’ll notice that Maslow’s list is very similar to the emotional drivers we looked at in week one that influence our decision -making.

Consider this:

SUSHI EXAMPLE: PERFECT CUSTOMER

In our example of a restaurant with a unique selling proposition of providing a unique, creative experience for risk-takers:

My perfect customer would likely value:

  • Self-actualization over safety
  • Adventure over predictability
  • Creativity over stability
  • And individuality over tradition
PRACTICE GUIDE: WHAT DO PEOPLE VALUE?

Check out your practice guide for a list of over 120 values that you can pick from in determining the values of your perfect customer.

WHERE DO YOU CONNECT?

Now that you’ve considered the values of your perfect customer, let’s look at how to itemize where your company’s message can connect with your perfect customer’s values.

Here’s an example:

EXAMPLE: SUSHI CONNECTIONS

I’ve compared the values of the perfect customer for my sushi emporium…I think I have found some connection points with my unique selling proposition.

EXAMPLE: FOCUS YOUR CONNECTIONS

Both my unique selling proposition and my perfect customer can be described as creative.

  • Risk-taking and adventurous are also similar qualities.

Given these connection points, I will focus my marketing message on areas that appeal to creative, adventurous people.

EXAMPLE: WHERE ARE THEY ENGAGED…OR NOT!

With this understanding of my perfect customer, I would look at outlets such as Facebook, Pinterest and other places that creative people would be engaged.

  • I would probably skip concentrating on Linkedin or other professional outlets at least for now.
EXAMPLE: TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF…

My description of my perfect customer could be something like:

• My perfect customer is a single male or female age 20-30 living within 10 miles of the local university.

• They have an average income of $25,000 to $35,000 and at least 2 years of college.

• They value creativity, adventure, and unique events.

• They enjoy travel on-the-cheap and experiencing other cultures.

• They engage with travel blogs, online mountaineering websites and follow the local alternative music scene.

• Though they don’t have a high level of disposable income, they will spend what they have for entertainment and dating.

Does this make it clearer who you are trying to communicate with in your marketing message?

TIME TO MAKE IT REAL!

This lesson’s practice guide helps you walk through these concepts and how to incorporate them into the description of your perfect customer.

NEXT LESSON

Now that you’ve developed a clear picture in your mind of who your perfect customer is, let’s focus on our next lesson: Who is My Actual Customer?”

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